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Thursday, July 3, 2014

Public Speaking and The Law of Expectations by Mike Moore



 The Law of Expectations states that we move toward and
eventually realize what we expect from life.  If you expect to
be successful, if you work hard to achieve success  and if you
never give up, you will achieve your expectations.

When you combine the law of expectations with
visualization you compound your possibilities.  If you expect
to be successful and visualize yourself as successful the
likelihood of you achieving success is certain. Remember, we
tend to become what we expect to become.

When applied to public speaking it looks like this.
When you are hired to give a speech expect it to be a
sparkling, enthusiastic success. Visualize yourself as an
interesting, witty, well informed master of the art who
totally enjoys the subject and the audience.  Hold this
expectation and vision in your mind firmly. Don’t let go of it
for anything.  Repeat over and over,” I tend to become what I
expect to become and achieve what I expect to achieve.”

If you commit yourself to this process you will begin
to see improvement in both your delivery and in your
relationship with your audience. You will be on the way to
becoming the speaker you want to become. What’s more, people
will want to listen to what you have to say and your charisma
quotient will increase significantly.

For more on how to become a well paid speaker Visit Here

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Public Speaking Humour Tip

I believe that humour is so important in every speech you deliver that  you should plan to include either a cartoon, humourous short story or funny one liner every 6 minutes.  My cartoon below would be perfect  when talking about communication/conversation skills.

121 Secrets to Profitable Speaking

Friday, June 27, 2014

Get Paid to Speak: Do You Have What it Takes?



HOW TO TELL IF YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO MAKE IT IN THE SPEAKING BUSINESS

I think that if you can answer  “Yes” to most of the
following questions you can be sure that you would make a good
speaker.
a.   Do you enjoy people?
b.   When you speak do people listen?
c.   Do you enjoy thinking on your feet?
d.   Are you interested in many things?
e.   Do you have hobbies?
f.   Do you feel that you have a message you would like to
share?
g.   Do you enjoy being the centre of attention?
h.   Are you enthusiastic about life?
i.   Are you well informed?
j.   DO YOU REALLY FEEL COMPELLED TO SPEAK?  

Go For it!!  I'm here to help.

Check out my 121 Secrets to Profitable Speaking

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Get Paid to Speak Tips

 
 
 
Get Paid to Speak Tips: The Value of Memory Devices in Recalling Content


I am one speaker who doesn’t like to stand behind a podium and refer to notes. I usually refer to my notes once or twice during a speech. That’s it.  I do think that checking your notes a couple of times gives the audience the feeling that you are well planned and on course. Constantly referring to them gives the opposite impression.

So how do I recall the content of my talks?  I use memory aids.  Here is an example.  I recently gave a presentation to a group of 600 highschool students on setting and achieving their goals. I jotted down the 6 content points and developed a word based on them. Each letter of my word reminded me of a specific content thread. The word I came up with was READS. R stood for respect and responsibility.  E. for enthusiasm and encouragement. A stood for attitude. D.for desire, drive and determination. S.reminded me of self confidence and self esteem.  Once I knew the word I was off and running. Give it a try. It really works.

For 121 Secrets to Profitable Speaking Visit Here



Sunday, March 9, 2014

How Get Started in the Business of Speaking

Hi to all. I just created a SPECIAL REPORT for those who would like to get into the business of paid public speaking. Each month I get email from people around the world seeking my advice on the subject.  Since I don't have time to answer all the questions I thought a SPECIAL REPORT would do the trick.  I call it  121 Secrets to Profitable Speaking and it is available AS A DOWNLOAD  for only $9.97 Stay well. Mike

Check out what you get .

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The Difference Between a Comedian and a Humorous Speaker


public speaking training 


A comedian is mainly concerned with making people
laugh. This is their only intention.  Humorous speakers, on
the other hand, use humor to get their message across; to
maintain audience attention and add spark to their
presentations. I have great respect for comedians. They have
nothing to hide behind when they’re on stage.
If they’re not funny the audience doesn’t respond and when
this happens they bomb. A humorous speaker can always hide
behind content when the audience doesn’t respond to their
humor.  It always gives me a sense of comfort to know that I
have somewhere to hide.

Check Out... " The Secrets to Profitable Speaking

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Using Humor in Public Speaking

 public speaking training




Using Humor in Public Speaking               

 When you use humor in your speeches you have a real
advantage over those speakers who don’t. People love to laugh
and to be amused so anyone who can accomplish this task is
well on the way to success, especially in public speaking.


Many people have forgotten how to laugh with gusto. It
is almost as if it is something they put away at the onset of
adulthood. Children have no problem laughing. In fact the
research indicates that children laugh over 400 time a day
while adults can only manage 15.  It is in our best interest
to rediscover the pleasure found in humor and laughter.


We learn to laugh by laughing.  I read recently about
a study that was done on laughter. One person in a group
started to laugh. The laugh began softly and gradually grew in
volume and intensity.  The other people in the room had no
idea what was causing the  laughter but they began to join in.
Soon everyone in the room was laughing heartily at nothing
more than the laughter of another. Try it sometime. Just start
laughing in the presence of others and see what happens.
People tend to join in the fun and good humor whether they
know the cause of it or not.

The same phenomenon applies to public speaking.  Some
believe that people should never laugh at their own jokes. I
disagree with this totally. If I am speaking and I share a
humorous anecdote or one liner within the context of the
speech I always laugh after telling it.

Inevitably the audience joins in whether they found
it funny or not. Those in the audience who found it  funny
laugh heartily. Those who didn’t find it funny end up laughing
with those who did. It works. Try it.

 If I am using  humor in my speech and I don’t laugh
after telling it, just how funny was it in the first place? If
I think the story is funny I want the audience to think so
too.  They will be more inclined to find it humorous if I am
standing in front of them obviously getting a charge out of it
myself.


 Get used to the fact that humor is subjective. What
one person finds funny another doesn’t. Some will literally
roll in the aisle laughing, others will sit there stone-faced,
some will be mildly amused and many will laugh quietly.  It is
important to remember that not all who sit unsmiling in front
of you didn’t enjoy  the humor in your story or remark. I once
had a person approach me after a speech and tell me how much
they enjoyed my humor. They could have fooled me for they
didn’t laugh at all throughout the talk. You really can’t tell
a book by its cover.


Once in awhile something you say in your talk will
result in howls of laughter and you will have no idea  what
made them laugh.  If this happens make a mental note of it and
use it again in your next speech. If it evokes laughter again
don’t question it. Just go with it and insert it into your
speech permanently. It was a gift.


Never use dirty humor. Even if there are people in
your audience who like this kind of humor there will be many
who don’t. Even those who are not offended by dirty humor in
their private lives are offended by it when it is used within
a speech.  Never risk alienating a good segment of your
audience with dirty humor. Now earthy humor is a different
matter.
                                                         
While I never use dirty humor in my talks, I frequently use earthy material.
Most people love a good earthy story providing it doesn’t cross the line.
Here is what I mean by earthy humor: Did you hear about the old man who streaked
through the annual flower show?  He won first prize in dried
arrangement. To me this is cute and earthy. Not too many would
be offended by this short piece....I don’t think.

For a lot more on all aspects of profitable speaking Click Here




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